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Dr. Bryan Carter


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Dr. Bryan Carter


Dr. C - Horseback Riding!!

Who is Dr. C?

Dr. Bryan Carter received his Ph.D. at the University of Missouri-Columbia and is an Assistant Professor of Africana Studies at the University of Arizona, specializing in African American literature of the 20th Century with a primary focus on the Harlem Renaissance and a secondary emphasis on digital culture. He has published numerous articles on his doctoral project, Virtual Harlem and has presented it at locations around the world. His research focuses on advanced visualization and how sustained and varied digital communication affects student retention and engagement in literature courses taught both online and face-to-face.

Dr. Carter's experience with virtual environments began with his dissertation project on which he began work in 1997; a 3D representation of a portion of Harlem, NY as it existed during the 1920s Jazz Age and Harlem Renaissance. This project, Virtual Harlem, was one of the earliest full virtual reality environments created for use in the humanities and certainly one of the first used in an African American literature course. Virtual Harlem has been presented at venues in Paris, The Netherlands, Sweden, Hungary, and multiple sites in the US.  In 2004, the University of Paris IV-Sorbonne, funded the development of Virtual Montmartre.  Dr. Carter was asked to be the project leader and was awarded the prestigious "Professeur Invite" from the Sorbonne to spend 6 months in Paris.  This project realized itself in the development of an interactive Web Site and a small 3D representation of the Lapin Agile, the oldest surviving cabaret in Montmartre which is still in operation. Since then, Dr. Carter has received a one month Professeur Invite Award from the Sorbonne a total of 10 times. The evolution of Virtual Harlem was funded in 2006 by the National Black Programming Consortium and the Government of Norway with the development of Virtual Harlem and Virtual Montmartre in Second Life. These sites were two of the most important locations during the Jazz Age/Harlem Renaissance.  Dr. Carter began teaching classes that met totally in Second Life in 2005 where his students have participated in role play, developed content and have collaborated with students from around the world. The project has evolved from Second Life to Open Simulator and Unity 3D.

In addition to these activities, Dr. Carter is very active with faculty development nationally and internationally. He has conducted workshops for faculty on Digital Humanities as well as specialized topics such as "Generational Learning Styles", "Podcasting", "Blogging", "Internet Broadcasting" and Second Life. He has done summer workshops for the National Council for Teachers of English on Digital Humanities, led a workshop session for the Digital Africana Studies Conference at the University of Maryland-College Park, conducted  workshops on Technology in the Classroom at Alabama A&M, worked with students attending the African American Literatures and Cultures Institute at the University of Texas, San Antonio, has been an invited speaker at the HumLab at Umea University in Sweden,  and at other international venues such as Vaxjo University in Sweden and  the University of Paris IV-Sorbonne.  Dr. Carter is regularly invited to venues around the world to offer keynote addresses or to serve on panels on Digital Humanities. 

Selected Publications:

Publications

Scholarly Books/Monographs:
 
2013    Digital Humanities: Current Perspective, Practices and Research. Cutting Edge Technologies in Higher Education, Volume 7, 1st Edition. London: Emerald Press, 2013. (100% effort) 133 pgs.
     
2006    Configuring History: Teaching the Harlem Renaissance Through Virtual Reality Cityscapes, co-authored with James J. Sosnoski and Patricia Harkin. Ed. Steve Jones. Digital formations. New York: Peter Lang, 2006. (33% effort) 201 pgs.

Chapters in Scholarly Books/Monographs:

2013    “The Cybergogy of Technical Communication.” Online Education 2.0.  with Leslie Scopes. Ed. Kelli Cargile-Cook. Baywood Press, 2013. (50% effort) pp. 179 – 195. 
    
2010    “Virtual Harlem: Building Community.” Telecollaboration 2.0: Language,     Literacies and Intercultural Learning in the 21st Century. Ed. Sara Guth and Francesca Helm. Bern: Peter Lang, 2010. (100% effort) pp. 365 – 373. 
    
2009    “Enhancing Virtual Environments.” Learning and Teaching in the Virtual World of Second Life. Ed. Judith Molka-Danielsen and Mats Deutschmann. Tapir Academic Press, 2009. (100% effort) pp. 103 – 114. 
    
“Empathy in Virtual Learning Environments,” with Judith Molka-Danielsen and Alastair Creelman. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organizations. Volume 6, Number 2. 2009. Online: http://inderscience.metapress.com/app/home/contribution.asp?referrer=parent&backto=issue,2,6;journal,11,29;linkingpublicationresults,1:110882,1 (25% effort) pp. 123 – 139. 

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Dr. C's Research


Exploring New Ways That Technology Intersects with Africana Studies...

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Dr. C's Research


Exploring New Ways That Technology Intersects with Africana Studies...

Virtual Harlem: The Virtual Harlem Project is a virtual representation of Harlem, NY as it existed during the 1920s Jazz Age. This project is one of the earliest full virtual reality environments created for use in the humanities and certainly one of the first for use in an African American literature course. Originally conceived while completing my doctoral studies at the University of Missouri-Columbia (UCM), Virtual Harlem has both grown and matured over the years. In 1996, a newsletter distributed to the faculty, staff and graduate teaching assistants at the university called for proposals to make use of a new technology called Virtual Reality. Of the hundreds of faculty at UCM, only two submitted proposals along with mine describing my vision for Virtual Harlem.

The project was originally proposed as a representation of a portion of Harlem, NY as it existed during the Harlem Renaissance/Jazz Age. The digital environment contains iconic locations like the Cotton Club, the Apollo Theater, Marshalls Hotel, museums, art galleries and the Harlem Branch Library. In addition to these famous locations, there are also interactive elements, collaborative possibilities, music of the period and opportunities for students to create projects related to the period and to role play.

The first version of this project was created to be displayed in CAVE environments located at UCM and at other locations in the United States and other parts of the world. Wearing 3D glasses and in some cases, virtually surrounded by virtual characters and buildings, visitors to the environment had the opportunity to interact with one another and the space itself. The Virtual Harlem Project has been presented at venues in Paris, The Netherlands, Sweden, Hungary, and multiple sites in the US. 

In 2004, the University of Paris IV-Sorbonne, funded the development of Virtual Montmartre and I was asked to be the project leader and was awarded the prestigious "Professeur Invite" from the Sorbonne to spend 6 months in Paris.  This project realized itself in the development of an interactive Web Site and a small 3D recreation of the Lapin Agile, the oldest surviving cabaret in Montmartre which is still in operation. The relationship to Virtual Harlem is clear to scholars of the Jazz Age/Harlem Renaissance, for it was in this Arrondisement in Paris, the 18th, that Jazz was introduced and popularized in Europe by African American troops who fought under the French flag in World War I. The evolution of Virtual Harlem was funded in 2006 by the National Black Programming Consortium and the Government of Norway with the development of Virtual Harlem and Virtual Montmartre in Second Life. Currently, the Virtual Harlem Project includes both of these locations.

In Second Life, The Virtual Harlem Project (now a combination of Virtual Harlem and Virtual Montmartre) blossomed. Through collaborations with academics, students, residents of Second Life, entertainers and artists, The Virtual Harlem Project has taken on new life. There are currently a variety of projects ongoing such as the development of an interactive game, a very active artist community with real-life artists displaying their work and conducting exhibits and presentations, jazz artists conducing live concerts, students actively working on course projects like museums and artists appreciation exhibits, tours and discussions. We even explored the use of Automated Agents portraying historic figures as a way to incorporate interactivity and offer information about the period.

In the Fall of 2012, the Virtual Harlem Project was ported to Open Sim. This was done for two reasons. First, the cost of maintaining environments in Second Life became extreme when Linden Lab eliminated the 50% educational discount which made it very difficult for many educators to justify the cost of one Sim, let alone two. Secondly, moving to an open source alternative seemed prudent. The project is currently housed at the University of St. Andrews. This collaboration is very exciting and we expect to incorporate a number of advanced features over the next year.

Feel free to visit Virtual Harlem and Virutal Montmartre, explore, engage, collaborate and most importantly, experience the period in Open Simulator. Coming to Unity 3D soon!!

Click here to visit Virtual Harlem

>Login - to create your Avatar

>Start - to download the client and enter Virtual Harlem

 

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Projects


Select Digital Africana Studies Projects

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Projects


Select Digital Africana Studies Projects

Virtual Harlem Video Clips

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Dr. C's Classes


Contact me for more info on any of the courses listed below

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Dr. C's Classes


Contact me for more info on any of the courses listed below

Digital Africana Studies

Exploring the intersections between Africana Studies, technology and Digital Humanities. It is through the use of digital tools that we are able to express our understanding of Africana Studies and affords faculty multimodal delivery approaches. 

AFAS 421 - When African Americans Came to Paris

Course Description:

African American expatriates in Paris were present before the turn of the 20th Century, going there for a variety of reasons: Racism in the States, opportunities abroad, and the ability to be oneself without the stigma of race attached to that identity were among those reasons. 

This course explores the fascinating history of African Americans in Paris from artists and musicians to writers, entrepreneurs and statesmen; when African Americans came to Paris, life for them at home and abroad changed forever.   

AFAS 499 - Independent Study (Abroad): When African Americans Came to Paris, Walking the Spirit Augmentation and Trip to Paris

This one-credit course offers students the unique opportunity to travel to Paris, France for one week during the Thanksgiving Break to experience that which we read throughout the term in AFAS 421, complete a collaborative video documenting that experience, and to work on and implement an Augmented Reality Project with an African American tour company, Walking the Spirit Tours. 

AFAS 160 -  Introduction to African American literature

In this course we will examine some of the major debates and central texts of African American literature from many different perspectives. The central theme of the course will be the relationship between race, representation and identity. The issues taken up by the writers and artists we will consider over the semester are still important and unresolved for us hundreds of years later.

AFAS 375 - Digital Africana Studies: Experiencing the Harlem Renaissance

In the 1920s and 1930s, the soulful rhythms of blues and jazz signaled an explosion of African American creativity. During this period, known as the New Negro Movement and later known as the Harlem Renaissance, musicians, dancers, visual artists, writers, and scholars sought to define their African heritage in American culture. During the period from just after World War I until a few years after the stock market crash in 1929, the vibrancy of the newly discovered African American art, music and literature were celebrated in Harlem, New York and reached even to the “city of light”, Paris, France.  Why Harlem? Why Paris? Several factors contributed to these places and this time.  These are a few of the many questions we will address in this course and explore through the use of digital technologies. The Harlem Renaissance is considered the first important movement of black artists and writers in the US, many of whom used experimental techniques to express their individuality. Likewise, our course methodology will incorporate interactive and experimental technologies to explore the movement, encouraging students to use a variety of digital tools to express an overall understanding of the Harlem Renaissance.

M1 - University of Paris IV-Sorbonne: Business Technologies and e-Commerce

This course is designed to introduce you to a variety of technologies and issues related to Business Communications, Digital Technologies and Cloud-Based Applications. Throughout this term we will not only discuss these ideas through class discussions and readings, but we will also make use of many of them as part of our course activities. 

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Study Abroad


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Study Abroad


When African Americans Came to Paris!!

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File Downloads


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File Downloads